The Impact series is a study of receding spatial relationships in a flowering open form. Due to the stability afforded by the wider base,  works in this series have an expanded vocabulary of fractured elements. The first work in the series was called Sudden Impact whose name gave definition to the series.

When viewed vertically the Hyperboloid forms have a more architectural feeling. When viewed horizontally they appear more sculptural and personal. The design of this series is based on two opposing fractured openings that communicate through the elements of color and texture and the interplay of positive and negative space.

The subtle wall curvature and diminishing wall thickness gives these works a sense of tension and lift. The rim carving evolved over time into large fractures and spiraling designs. Many of the relationships between positive and negative space are developed in the Conics and then translated into other series.

The inspiration for the Tower series came from a prehistoric Anasazi round tower in Mesa Verde, Colorado. This Anasazi tower was photographed by Ansel Adams in 1941 and a replica was built by architect Mary Colter on the south rim of the Grand Canyon in 1932. The series explores a range of vertical forms including primitive Anasazi towers as well as modern nuclear cooling towers.

The ideas behind the more complex Torsion forms are rooted in cosmology and concepts of warped space. These seemingly chaotic works have a balance and symmetry that is not immediately apparent until all of the diverse elements come into focus. The underlying theme shows a fractured spiral that rotates from one rim to the other through a strong central arch.

The Bronze series is a study in the translation. The use of bronze creates a sense of history and permanence that feels removed from the personal where wood is almost the antitheses with its approachable warm tones and textures. In collaboration with Shidoni foundry in Tesuque, NM, several bronze Torsions were created using the lost wax process. Adding a rich patina to the cold, smooth metal surface produces an interesting reinterpretation of the Torsion form.

As a reflection of Mimbres ceremonies where clay pots were intentionally “killed” or broken to connect with their spirit world, these fractured Indian pots offer a connection to Native American culture in a modern context. This series combines the Native American motif of earlier work with the sculptural fracturing of current work.

Spiral Impact 7, 2012, 26 x 26 x 21”

Spiral Impact 7, 2012, 26 x 26 x 21”

American Impact, 2006, 24 x 24 x 20”

Brazilian Impact, 2005, 19 x 19 x 16”

Brazilian Impact, 2005, 19 x 19 x 16”

Spiral Impact 3, 2007, 23 x 23 x 24”

Spiral Impact 8, 2014, 26 x 26 x 21”

Dancing Impact 4, 2011, 26 x 26 x 22”

Hyperboloid 2, 2006, 15 x 15 x 19”

Hyperboloid 2, 2006, 15 x 15 x 19”

Hyperboloid 2, detail

Hyperboloid 2, detail

Hyperboloid 3, 2007, 19 x 19 x 24”

Hyperboloid 3, detail

Hyperboloid 3, 2007, 19 x 19 x 24”

Hyperboloid 3, detail

Dancing Conic 1, 2008, 24 x 24 x 24”

Dancing Conic 1, detail

Fire Conic, 2008, 24 x 24 x 24”

Fire Conic, top view

Spiral Conic 2, 2010, 24 x 24 x 24”

Spiral Conic 2, top view

Tulipwood Conic, 2007, 19 x 19 x 13”

Tulipwood Conic, top view

Leaning Tower, 2014, 14 x 14 x 27”

Leaning Tower, detail

Cooling Tower, 2009, 21 x 21 x 28”

Cooling Tower, detail

Fragmented Tower, 2001, 14 x 14 x 19”

Fragmented Tower, detail

Fractured Tower, 2002, 14 x 14 x 20”

Fractured Tower, detail

Tulipwood Torsion 3, 2002, 20 x 14 x 20”

Tulipwood Torsion 3, detail

Bubinga Torsion, 2002, 20 x 16 x 20”

Bubinga Torsion, detail

Tulipwood Torsion 2, 2001, 20 x 12, 20”

Tulipwood Torsion 2, detail

Bocote Torsion, 2004, 19 x 14 x 19” (NM Museum of Art)

Bocote Torsion, detail

Inversion #3, Bronze, 2001, 16 x 11 x 16”

Inversion #3, detail

Inversion #1, Bronze, 1999, 16 x 11 x 14”

Inversion #1, detail

Inversion #2, Bronze, 2001, 11 x 11 x 16”

Inversion #2, detail

Indian Pot 1, 2010, 14 x 14 x 11”

Calakmul, 2012, 12 x 12 x 15”

Acoma, 2010, 12 x 12 x 12”

Cuyamunque, 2011, 14 x 14 x 11”

Chacobolo, 2012, 14 x 14 x 11”

Indian Pot 4, 2011, 14 x 14 x 11”

Hovenweep, 2011, 12 x 12 x 15”

These classic open and enclosed segmented bowls are made of exotic and domestic hardwoods from around the world. Every wood has its own peculiar color, texture, density and working properties and this series explores the range and diversity of these woods in lathe turned bowls and vases.

These turnings are based on a vertical staving technique as distinct from the horizontal segments that are used in most other works on this website. Creating turnings from staves offers a unique design potential that can be seen here in the use of ordered or random geometric veneer patterns.

The turnings in this series explore the use of piercing silver rods as elegant design elements giving a sense of tension, balance or lift to the works. Silver point inlay is often used in star constellation designs with different diameter points reflecting the different magnitudes.

These little bowls are made of beautiful burl woods and from a variety of exotic hardwoods from around the world. Pieces are usually only one to three inches in diameter and are buffed to a high polish.

Tulipwood Bowl, 1993, 4” dia

Cocobolo Bowl, 1999, 7” dia

Bubinga Open, 2001, 13” dia

Ebony Open Bowl, 1999, 5” dia

Kingwood Anasazi, 2002, 10” dia

Peroba Rosa Bowl, 1993, 6” dia

Panga-panga, 1992, 5 x 5 x 16″

Ebony Open Bowl, 1999, 5” dia

Wenge Pinstripe, 1986, 4” dia

Kingwood Vase, 1986, 4.5” dia

Vertical Veneers 3, Cocobolo, 1987, 4.5” dia

Pheus 5, Bloodwood, 1987, 5” dia

Fluted Veneers, Bloodwood, 1989, 7” dia

Bloodwood Pinstripe, 1993, 4” dia

Pheus 3, Satinwood, 4.5” dia

Singularity 6, 1989, 8” dia

Cristobal Tightwire, 1991, 8 x 10 x 14”

Piercing Rods 4, 1991, 14 x 6 x 6”

Satinwood Tightwire, 1989, 8 x 10 x 14”

Horizontal Rods, 1991, 10 x 10 x 7”

Bootes Tightwire, 1992. 8 x 10 x 14”

Piercing Rods 8, 1993, 7 x 9 x 5”

Small bowl grouping

Australian amboyna burl

American redwood burl

Mexican cocobolo

Mexican bocote

African pink ivorywood

African blackwood

Some of the earliest turnings were were made from beautiful burl woods from the Pacific Northwest including maple, walnut, redwood, myrtle wood and lilac root burls. Turnings often included exotic hardwood laminates and veneers accents. From 1982 to 1986.

Based on the designs of Sikyatki ceramics from Hopi mesa in Arizona, these early segmented pieces use geometric designs in exotic hardwoods. Segmented designs rings and laminates are added to burl wood bodies to create Native American motifs. From 1984 to 1987.

Influenced by ancient Anasazi corrugated ceramics from the American southwest around 200 AD, these dyed and textured turnings are studies in primitive forms and surfaces. They are made of stave constructed and ebonized Honduras mahogany. From 1987 to 1991.

The Painted series evolved as a desire to interpret the colorful Memphis style through the language of lathe turned objects. These works explore bleached, painted, airbrushed and metalized surfaces on a range of traditional and non-traditional forms. From 1986 to 1992.

Maple burl plate, 1983, 10” dia

Maple burl bowl, 1983, 7” dia

Lilac burl bowl, 1983, 5” dia

Walnut burl bowl, 1984, 4” dia

Maple burl bowl, 1985, 7” dia

Maple burl bowl, 1984, 5” dia

Walnut burl w/segments, 1986, 8” dia

Maple burl w/segments, 1984, 8” dia

Maple burl w/segments, 1985, 7” dia

Walnut w/segments, 1986, 8” dia

Maple burl w/segments, 1984, 8” dia

Walnut segmented bowl, 1987, 8” dia

Bubinga segmented bowl, 1987, 7” dia

Anasazi olla, 1987, 7” dia

Anasazi seed pot, 1987, 7” dia

Anasazi water pot, 1987 6” dia

Anasazi olla, 1988, 7” dia

Corrugated #12, 1988, 7” dia

Longneck Seedpot, 1991, 7” tall

Shortneck Seedpot, 1991, 5” dia

Buried Vessel, 1987, 7” dia

Flowering Vase, 1986, 8” tall

Bluestain 3, 1987, 6” dia

Blue Vase, 1988, 7” tall

Connections 2, 1987, 14” tall

Depositions 2, 1990, 9” dia

Metalized Columns, 1992, 6’ tall

Anthropomorphics, 1988, 8’ tall